Chicken Pox


Chickenpox or chicken pox is a highly contagious illness caused by primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV). It generally starts with a vesicular skin rash appearing in two or three waves, mainly on the body and head rather than the hands and becoming itchy raw pockmarks, small open sores which heal mostly without scarring.

Chickenpox has an incubation period of 10 to 21 days, and is spread easily through coughs or sneezes of ill individuals, or through direct contact with secretions from the rash. Following primary infection there is usually lifelong protective immunity from further episodes of chickenpox.

Chickenpox is rarely fatal, although it is generally more severe in adults than in children. Pregnant women and those with a suppressed immune system are at highest risk of serious complications. The most common late complication of chicken pox is shingles, caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus decades after the initial episode of chickenpox.

Symptoms of Chicken Pox:

Chickenpox is a highly infectious disease that spreads from person to person by direct contact or by air from an infected person's coughing or sneezing. Touching the fluid from a chickenpox blister can also spread the disease. A person with chickenpox is infectious from one to five days before the rash appears. The contagious period continues until all blisters have formed scabs, which may take 5 to 10 days. It takes from 10 to 21 days after contact with an infected person for someone to develop chickenpox.

The chicken pox lesions (blisters) start as a two to four millimeter red papule which develops an irregular outline (a rose petal). A thin-walled, clear vesicle (dew drop) develops on top of the area of redness. This "dew drop on a rose petal" lesion is very characteristic of chickenpox. After about 8 to 12 hours the fluid in the vesicle becomes cloudy and the vesicle breaks leaving a crust. The fluid is highly contagious, but once the lesion crusts over, it is not considered contagious. The crust usually falls off after seven days sometimes leaving a crater-like scar. Although one lesion goes through this complete cycle in about seven days, another hallmark of chickenpox is that new lesions crop up every day for several days. Therefore it may be a week before new lesions stop appearing and existing lesions crust over. Children should not be sent back to school until all lesions have crusted over.

It is not necessary to have contact with the infected person for the disease to spread. Infected persons can spread chickenpox before they know they have the disease, i.e. before any rash develops. They can infect others from about two days before the rash develops until all the sores have crusted over, usually four or five days after the rash starts.

Treatment with Shuttle Lotion:

Although there have been no formal clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of topical application of Shuttle Lotion, a topical barrier preparation containing zinc oxide and one of the most commonly used interventions, it has an excellent safety profile. It is important to maintain good hygiene and daily cleaning of skin with warm water to avoid secondary bacterial infection.[citation needed]. Addition of a small quantity of vinegar to the water is sometimes advocated.

To relieve the symptoms of chicken pox, people commonly use anti-itching creams and lotions such as Shuttle Lotion. Shuttle Lotion is not to be used on the face or close to the eyes.

Click here to Buy Now !!





Shopping cart

There are no products in your shopping cart.

0 Items $0.00

Navigation

User login